APTN: NB chiefs group, Mi’kmaq district council received contracts from SWN and Irving-owned security firm

SOURCE: http://aptn.ca/pages/news/2013/11/14/nb-chiefs-group-mikmaq-district-council-received-contracts-swn-irving-owned-security-firm/

NB chiefs group, Mi’kmaq district council received contracts from SWN and Irving-owned security firm

National News | 14. Nov, 2013 by | 0 Comments

NB chiefs group, Mi’kmaq district council received contracts from SWN and Irving-owned security firm

By Jorge Barrera
APTN National News
The main New Brunswick chiefs organization received a contract from a Houston-based energy company facing ferocious opposition from Elsipogtog First Nation residents over its shale gas exploration.

SWN Resources Canada also “did everything right” under the consultation process agreed to between the provincial government and the Assembly of First Nations Chiefs in New Brunswick, according to the lawyer for the chiefs organization.

The AFNCNB has been receiving funding from SWN for the past two years to provide environmental monitoring for the company while it explores for shale gas in the province, said Mike Scully, who is the consultation liaison for the AFNCNB.

Scully said six people have been hired to follow SWN’s workers as they work exploration lines in their search for shale gas deposits.

Scully also said that Industrial Security Ltd (ISL), which is on contract with SWN, issued a subcontract to the North Shore Mi’kmaq District Council for nine people to do “security related work” associated with SWN. Elsipogtog First Nation is not part of the district council which includes seven Mi’kmaq communities in the region.

The council includes the communities of  Bouctouche First Nation, Eel Ground First Nation, Eel River First Nation, Fort Folly First Nation, Indian Island First Nation, Pabineau First Nation and Metepenagiag First Nation.

ISL also subcontracted work to Chief to Chief Consulting. 

The Irving shadow

ISL is owned by JD Irving Ltd. and it is part of a corporate empire headed by the Irving family which dominates New Brunswick.  The Irvings have cast a large shadow over the ongoing Mi’kmaq-led anti-fracking protests.

Along with owning ISL, JD Irving also owns the compound at the centre of the RCMP’s heavily-armed Oct. 17 raid. The raid freed SWN’s trucks which were in the compound that had been blocked by an anti-fracking camp along Route 134 in Rexton, NB.

ISL is also expected to play a key role in the upcoming trial of six members of the Mi’kmaq Warrior Society. Some of the warriors face charges for allegedly confining up to seven employees of “Irving security” in a compound holding SWN’s vehicles on Oct. 16, according to RCMP charge sheets.

Irving Oil , which is operated independently from JD Irving, has an interest in seeing the development of shale gas deposits as a source of cheap energy to expand its refining capacity to handle Alberta mined bitumen which is expected to flow to the province if TransCanada’s Energy East pipeline project gets approved. TransCanada and Irving Oil announced a joint venture in August to build a new $300 million marine terminal in Saint John.

AFNCNB says forced to consult on NB’s terms

Scully couldn’t say how much money the contracts with ISL and SWN are worth.

Scully was asked to speak to APTN National News on behalf of the AFNCNB by Eel Ground First Nation Chief George Ginnish. Ginnish is co-chair of the AFNCNB.

Dozens of Elsipogtog residents and their allies turned back SWN’s exploration trucks Thursday after an hours long standoff involving the RCMP on Hwy 11, about 46 km north of the community. One woman was arrested for allegedly “causing a disturbance,” the RCMP said.

Elsipogtog Coun. Craig Sock said the band had also filed for an injunction Thursday against SWN with the New Brunswick Court of Queen’s Bench in Fredericton. Sock said the band is seeking to have a judge stop SWN’s work until the company conducts more consultation.

“They never did any consultation with our community,” said Sock.

Scully also said Elsipogtog gave the AFNCNB the mandate to conduct consultation on the community’s behalf about two years ago.

“The assembly has delegated authority from the member bands to conduct the procedural aspects of consultation on their behalf,” said Scully.

Sock said that delegated authority was signed over by a previous band council.

“This is a whole new chief and council and the community wasn’t consulted properly,” said Sock.

But Scully said SWN did everything it had to do under the phased in consultation process agreed to by the AFNCNB and the province which focused exclusively on exploration. Scully said SWN only received licenses from the province to explore which narrowed the scope of the consultation.

“In my view SWN did everything right,” he said.

Scully said the chiefs weren’t happy with that approach and wanted consultation on all aspects of the planned project, from exploration to extraction, but the province wouldn’t budge.

“(The province) asserted the decision was to issue permits for seismic exploration and that is the decision that technically and legally we were limited to consult on,” said Scully. “There is a reciprocal duty to consult…we didn’t like it but we worked within the parameters that were proposed.”

The AFNCNB have belated called on the province to suspend SWN’s licenses following the Oct. 17 raid.

Ginnish said in a statement that the “phased approach to consultation is incompatible with the Aboriginal perspective.”

The statement did not mention the AFNCNB receiving a contract from SWN as part of the consultation process or that SWN paid for AFNCNB staff to visit the company’s operations in Arkansas.

Scully said people from Elsipogtog also went to Arkansas on the company’s dime, but he would not reveal who they were.

jbarrera@aptn.ca

@JorgeBarrera

Canada’s largest energy union wants national fracking moratorium

Canada’s largest energy union wants national fracking moratorium

Posted November 14, 2013 by Damien Gillis in Economics

Canada's largest energy union calls for national fracking moratorium

First Nations and supporters protest fracking in Vancouver last month (Damien Gillis)

Canada’s largest private sector union, Unifor, has joined the growing chorus of concern over controversial shale gas development. The labour organization representing over 300,000 members in a wide range of economic sectors, including energy, is calling for a national fracking moratorium.

Unifor issued a statement from its 25-member National Executive Board Thursday raising concerns about the impacts of  shale gas development on the environment and on First Nations’ rights.

“Unconventional gas fracking has the potential to have catastrophic effects on our environment and economy. The safety risks are also a major concern for our union,” said Unifor National President Jerry Dias.

Just because we can carry out this activity does not mean we should. We must enact a national moratorium on fracking activity.

Provinces pass fracking moratoriums

The call comes on the heels of provincial fracking moratoriums in Quebec and Newfoundland and Labrador – and France’s recent national ban on shale gas.

Fracking has become a hot topic across the country in recent months.

In BC, a lawsuit against the provincial regulator over water permits for fracking was announced on Wednesday, while a high profile court case over water contamination winds its way through Alberta’s courts. The industry minister for the Northwest Territories is developing a new regulatory model for shale oil in advance of devolution, and fracking remains a highly controversial subject in New Brunswick, where First Nations recently clashed with the RCMP over exploratory work by an American company.

Support for First Nations

That last point was a key factor in Unifor’s decision to come out against fracking – as the union noted in its statement:

Any resource extraction industry in Canada must confront the problem of unresolved aboriginal land claims, and the inadequate economic benefits (including employment opportunities) which have been offered to First Nations communities from resource developments.

Despite the potential job benefits to its, members, Unifor remains highly critical of the shale gas industry, concluding:

Instead of being guided by short-term swings in prices and profits for private energy producers, Canada’s federal and provincial governments must develop and implement (in cooperation with other stakeholders) a national plan for a stable, sustainable energy industry that respects our social and environmental commitments, and generates lasting wealth for all who live here.

Council of Canadians calls for national fracking moratorium

Unifor’s call for a national moratorium echoes recent statements by public interest group The Council of Canadians.

Canada’s big energy workers’ unions are increasingly taking a critical look at the job promises from fossil fuel development. Watch this speech by president of the Communications, Energy and Paperworkers Union, Dave Coles, at last year’s Defend Our Coast rally in Victoria, explaining why his members are “diametrically opposed” to Tar Sands pipelines to BC’s coast:

APTN: Security firm protecting SWN hired company owned by ex-con who claimed undercover work for RCMP in Akwesasne

SOURCE: http://aptn.ca/pages/news/2013/11/14/security-firm-protecting-swn-hired-company-owned-ex-con-claimed-undercover-work-rcmp-akwesasne/

Security firm protecting SWN hired company owned by ex-con who claimed undercover work for RCMP in Akwesasne

National News | 14. Nov, 2013 by | 0 Comments

(YouTube video posted in August shows Stephen Sewell in a heated argument with opponents to SWN Resources Canada’s shale gas exploration)

By Jorge Barrera
APTN National News
The security company hired by SWN Resources Canada to protect equipment during its controversial shale gas exploration project subcontracted work to a consulting firm owned by an ex-convict who claims he did undercover work for the RCMP in Akwesasne.

Industrial Security Ltd. (ISL), which is owned by JD Irving Ltd., subcontracted work to Chief to Chief Consulting, according to New Brunswick lawyer Mike Scully, who works for the Assembly of First Nations Chiefs of New Brunswick as the consultation liaison with SWN.

ISL has been conducting security for SWN, a Houston-based energy firm that is facing ferocious opposition to its shale gas exploration work from the Mi’kmaq residents of Elsipogotog First Nation.

ISL employees were also providing security for the JD Irving-owned compound holding SWN vehicles at the centre of an Oct. 17 raid by RCMP tactical units. The raid against a Mi’kmaq-led anti-fracking camp which was blocking the compound freed SWN’s vehicles.

Mi’kmaq fracking opponents were again facing off against the RCMP Thursday.

Chief to Chief Consulting was registered as a New Brunswick company on April 17 by Stephen Sewell, a Mi’kmaq man from Pabineau First Nation.  Sewell self-published a tell-all book describing his undercover work for the RCMP infiltrating smuggling networks in Akwesasne and the Hells Angels biker gang.

Scully said Chief to Chief Consulting had a total of nine people working under the contract for security-related tasks. Scully said the company was hired as “first responders and health and safety monitors” and to be “a buffer between the security (company) and the general public.”

Randy Wilson, director of corporate security for JD Irving, did not return a phoned and emailed request for comment from APTN National News on ISL’s decision to subcontract out work to Chief to Chief. APTN National News asked Wilson if Sewell’s claimed past work as an RCMP informant played any role in the decision to give the company a contract.

APTN National News contacted JD Irving’s media relations team and is still waiting for a response.

Elsipogtog First Nation’s former War Chief Gary Augustine is also employed by Chief to Chief.

Scully said he didn’t know exactly what Chief to Chief was doing at the moment or if they had any other contracts with SWN.

APTN National News contacted SWN’s office in Moncton seeking to speak to Sewell. The receptionist said Sewell was in the boardroom for a meeting, but wasn’t available to talk.

APTN National News has also left numerous messages over the past several weeks on Sewell’s home telephone voicemail.

Sewell spent time in federal and provincial jails for drug and violent crime while also claiming to have worked for the RCMP as an informant covered under the Witness Protection Program, according to his book, Abused, Addicted, Incarcerated: Canada’s Shame: The Autobiography of An Aboriginal Rebel. The book also describes his conversion to Christianity. It was published in 2011.

Sewell wrote that he served four years in the Dorchester penitentiary after being convicted on 21 domestic-related offenses against his ex-partner. The charges included putting a gun to the “back of her head” while telling her “she was going to die” while she was in “the fetal position and begging for her life.”

In the book, written under the pseudonym Chief Poison Feather, Sewell claims he never pointed the gun at the woman; he just took out a box containing the weapon and threatened to use it.

“I told her that she had better shut the fuck up and let it go or I was going to shut her the fuck up in my own way. She finally shut up, but the gun wasn’t even taken out of the box. That alone would have knocked two years off of my sentence because I was charged with pointing the firearm at her,” wrote Sewell.

Sewell claimed in the book he began working as an RCMP informant under the Witness Protection Program sometime in 1994. Sewell wrote that he signed a contract at the RCMP’s J Division headquarters in Fredericton, NB.

“I would start at $500 a week plus expenses, plus a five thousand-dollar pay-off at the end,” wrote Sewell.

Sewell wrote that he was eventually given tens of thousands of dollars by the RCMP for the undercover work he did for the federal police force which included infiltrating the Hells Angels biker gang on the East Coast.

Sewell claimed that his successful undercover work led the RCMP to send him to Cornwall, Ont., to infiltrate biker and Mafia-linked organizations in the city.

He said he was ordered to infiltrate the Mohawk community of Akwesasne, which straddles the Canada-U.S. border, under the name of “Stephen Sock.” The operation ran from 1995 to 1998, he wrote.

Throughout his description of his work infiltrating Akwesasne, Sewell dropped the names of well-known families and individuals in the community. Sewell wrote that he helped smuggle alcohol and cigarettes across the St. Lawrence River and all the way to Mohawk community of Kahnawake near Montreal. In the book, he includes a police surveillance image of a boat piloted by men with ski masks with the cutline: “Smuggling from New York to Ontario while working undercover.”

He also claimed to have taken part in gang rapes with the bikers.

“I always kept the RCMP abreast of the situation. They told me that if the victim doesn’t file a complaint, then they were not going to act,” wrote Sewell. “It was almost expected, even from the girls at these parties, that they would be used or even expected to satisfy anyone’s sexual urges.”

Sewell wrote that he worked with four undercover RCMP officers and they posed as criminal organization behind a business front called Paradise Construction Plus based in Montreal. According to Sewell, the operation ended in February 1998 and led to 18 arrests. He said the operation bought C-4 explosives, a rocket launcher, AK-47s, AR-15s and M11′s, grenades, dynamite, cocaine and “$7 million worth of heroin from Hong Kong.”

jbarrera@aptn.ca

APTN: RCMP officers arrest Elsipogtog woman as SWN’s thumper trucks return

SOURCE: http://aptn.ca/pages/news/2013/11/14/rcmp-officers-arrest-elsipogtog-woman-swns-thumper-trucks-return/

RCMP officers arrest Elsipogtog woman as SWN’s thumper trucks return

National News | 14. Nov, 2013 by | 0 Comments

RCMP officers arrest Elsipogtog woman as SWN’s thumper trucks return

(Elsipogtog resident Lorraine Clair arrested by RCMP officers Thursday morning. Photo courtesy of Charmaine Sock)

APTN National News
LAKETON, NB--A woman from Elsipogtog First Nation was reportedly arrested Thursday morning as SWN Resources Canada resumed its controversial shale gas exploration north of the community.

RCMP officers reportedly arrested Lorraine Clair, a high-profile Elsipogtog resident who has consistently opposed SWN’s exploration work.

New Brunswick RCMP spokeswoman Const. Jullie Rogers-Marsh confirmed one person was arrested for “causing a disturbance.” Rogers-Marsh said no charges have yet been laid.

“Things are continuing to be peaceful other then the arrest,” said Rogers-Marsh. “We are going to continue to stay in the area and monitor the situation. We are going to continue to ensure public safety.”

SWN’s thumper trucks returned to an area about 46 km north of Elsipogtog. The thumper trucks work with geophones, which were strung along Hwy 11 by SWN Wednesday, to capture images of shale gas deposits underground.

RCMP officers were videotaped loading riot gear earlier in the day in Moncton, NB, which sits about 100 km away from SWN’s current exploration area.

Heavily armed RCMP tactical units raided a Mi’kmaq-led anti-fracking camp on Oct. 17 to free SWN exploration vehicles which were trapped inside a compound owned by JD Irving Ltd.

 

APTN: Elsipogtog prepares to confront SWN’s machinery

National News | 13. Nov, 2013 by | 0 Comments

Elsipogtog prepares to confront SWN’s machinery

(Elsipogtog Warriors and supporters along Hwy 11 where SWN Resources Canada laid down geophone lines Tuesday. Photo courtesy of Charmaine Sock)

APTN National News
LAKETON, NB–Warriors from Elsipogtog First Nation were preparing Tuesday evening to confront the machinery owned by a Houston-based energy firm conducting shale gas exploration work just north of the Mi’kmaq community.

SWN Resources Canada is expected to roll out its thumper trucks Wednesday in an area along Hwy 11 and about 46 kilometres north of Elsipogtog First Nations. The company laid out a string of geophones Tuesday which will be used to capture the vibrations emitted by the thumper trucks to create imagery of shale gas deposits in the area.

The majority of residents in Elsipogtog want to stop SWN’s exploration work fearing its completion would lead to the extraction of shale gas deposits through hydraulic fracturing, or fracking.

Several warriors and supporters gathered around a fire Tuesday evening along Hwy 11 preparing for Wednesday’s appearance of the thumper trucks. Several planned to stay at the site overnight, with some sleeping in tents and others beneath tarps strapped to branches.

“When the sun rises I will be there waiting,” said Sequoyah Bernard, 19, one of the Warriors. “Whatever we decided to do that at that time, we will do.”

Bernard said the tactic could simply be standing the way of the trucks.

“We are not planning anything violent, it will be peaceful, we are going to stand together,” said Bernard.

The RCMP warned people at the encampment earlier in the day that they would be charged with mischief if they impeded SWN’s machinery from doing its work, according to video of the encounter which was posted on Facebook.

Bernard said the threat of charges did little to dampen their resolve.

“With all due respect, we are not listening to what they say. If they want to run us over, they can try,” said Bernard.

Bernard said the RCMP was in the area and a cruiser with its lights flashing was parked nearby along the highway.

“It is just something I feel I have to do,” said Bernard. “I am here for my people, protecting my people. That is what my job title is here.

RCMP Const. Jullie Rogers-Marsh said the RCMP is monitoring the situation.

“Based on things that have happened previously, it would be irresponsible for us not to be in the area,” said Rogers-Marsh.

Rogers-Marsh said the RCMP is not there to protect SWN.

“We are not private security,” she said.

The Canadian military also tried to dispel rumours it’s involved in ongoing police operations in the area.

“Currently, there is no official request for military support to RCMP,” said Capt. Clayton Myhill, with the Canadian Joint Operations Command.

SWN referred calls to communications firm Cape Consulting. Calls to senior consultant Tracey Stephenson went to voice mail.

SWN is planning to conduct 14 days of exploration before leaving the region, according to one of the lawyers hired by the firm.

Michael Connors, who is a partner with East Coast law firm McInnes Cooper, met with several dozen people from Elsipogtog and the surrounding communities late Sunday afternoon. He said the company would resume operating their thumper trucks Wednesday.

Connnors said they would face violence if they confronted the company with a blockade.

“Unfortunately, blockades lead to violence,” said Connors, according to a video of the meeting posted on Facebook.

Elsipogtog War Chief John Levi told Connors that the community would not be backing down.

“We are going to be there. Whatever happens, the ball is in your court. Whatever happens, you’re the ones who are going to make the calls,” said Levi, according to the nine-minute video. “Us as Natives and the protectors of this land, we are going to protect it, it is our land, we never ceded this land and we are going to protect it before these waters are contaminated.”

A woman in the crowd, who identified as non-Native, also pledged opposition to the exploration.

“As non-Natives we are going to protect the future of our children,” said the woman, in the video. “So non-Natives and Natives are together.”

SWN has faced intense and prolonged opposition to its shale gas exploration work around Elsipogtog First Nation which exploded after heavily armed RCMP tactical units raided an anti-fracking camp along Route 134 on Oct. 17.The camp was blocking several of SWN’s vehicles which were in a compound owned by JD Irving Ltd.

While the raid freed SWN’s trucks, it sparked day-long clashes between Elsipogtog residents and the RCMP. Several RCMP vehicles were torched and about 40 people were arrested.

A camp still remains on Route 134, which sits about 15 km southeast of Elsipogtog.

People in Elsipogtog and surrounding communities fear the discovery of shale gas would lead to hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. The controversial extraction method is viewed by many as posing a dire threat to water sources.

WCNN: Heavy RCMP presence accompanies SWN’s return

From West Coast Native News SOURCE: http://westcoastnativenews.com/heavy-rcmp-presence-accompanies-swns-return/

Heavy RCMP presence accompanies SWN’s return

derrick on November 12th, 2013 6:45 pm – 1 Comment

A heavy RCMP presence is in an area Tuesday where a Houston-based energy company is expected to resume its controversial shale gas exploration.

About 30 people from Elsipogtog and their supporters have set up a camp near Hwy 11 by Laketon, NB., where SWN Resources is expected to begin laying down geophones in preparation for seismic testing set for Wednesday.

The exploration area is about 46 kilometres north of Elsipogtog First Nation.

Elsipogtog War Chief John Levi said the RCMP presence may be larger than what was witnessed during the Oct. 17 raid of an anti-fracking camp that was blocking SWN’s vehicles in a compound owned by JD Irving Ltd.

“You never know what they are going to do,” said Levi. “They might be shooting their real guns this time, that is what I am worried about.”

Levi said he’s been getting calls and texts all morning from an RCMP liaison officer trying to speak to him.

“I don’t feel like to talking to them right now,” said Levi.

RCMP Const. Jullie Rogers-Marsh said the RCMP is monitoring the situation.

“Based on things that have happened previously, it would be irresponsible for us not to be in the area,” said Rogers-Marsh.

Rogers-Marsh said the RCMP is not there to protect SWN.

“We are not private security,” she said. “We have no issues as far as protesting, everybody has a right to do it as long as they do it peacefully and don’t break the law.”

SWN referred calls to communications firm Cape Consulting. Calls to senior consultant Tracey Stephenson went to voice mail.

About a dozen Mi’kmaq Warriors camped out overnight along Hwy 11. The group was joined by reinforcements on Tuesday morning and people there gathered around a small fire keeping warm.

“Geophones are all set on the road, SWN is working really fast and the trucks and driving back and forth,” one of the people at the site told APTN National News.

SWN’s lawyer Michael Connors, who is a partner with East Coast law firm McInnes Cooper, met with several dozen people from the Elsipogtog First Nation and the surrounding communities late Sunday afternoon.

Connors told the people that SWN would withdraw a lawsuit against several community members if the Houston-based firm was allowed to finish its exploration work unimpeded.

The meeting was held at a longhouse erected at an anti-fracking encampment used over the past summer. The area sits off Hwy 116 near Elsipogtog First Nation.

Connors told the people in the longhouse that SWN would be working for 14 days and warned them not to block the company’s movements or they would face violence.

“I’m not asking anyone not to protest, but I am asking that we don’t do anything that would lead to violence,” said Connors, according to video of the meeting posted on Facebook by Brian Milliea. “Unfortunately, blockades lead to violence.”

Connors said SWN just wants to finish its work and leave the area.

“We don’t want violence and if we can get through two weeks then we will go away for awhile,” said Connors. “I am not saying we are not going to come back, we may not come back, but I think everybody needs some time, you know a break.”

Levi told Connors that the community would not be backing down.

“We are going to be there. Whatever happens, the ball is in your court. Whatever happens, you’re the ones who are going to make the calls,” said Levi, according to the nine minute video. “Us as Natives and the protectors of this land, we are going to protect it, it is our land, we never ceded this land and we are going to protect it before these waters are contaminated.”

A woman in the crowd, who identified as non-Native, also pledged opposition to the exploration.

“As non-Natives we are going to protect the future of our children,” said the woman, in the video. “So non-Natives and Natives are together.”

SWN has faced intense and prolonged opposition to its shale gas exploration work around Elsipogtog First Nation which exploded after heavily armed RCMP tactical units raided an anti-fracking camp along Route 134 on Oct. 17.

While the raid freed SWN’s trucks, it sparked day-long clashes between Elsipogtog residents and the RCMP. Several RCMP vehicles were torched and about 40 people were arrested.

A camp still remains on Route 134, which sits about 15 km southeast of Elsipogtog.

People in Elsipogtog and surrounding communities fear the discovery of shale gas would lead to hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. The controversial extraction method is viewed by many as posing a dire threat to water sources.

Currently, Mi’kmaq War Chief, John Levi, has sent out the following message: “Calling out on all the support swn coming back Tuesday and will be thumping by Wednesday need all the support and RCMP wants to block all the roads for 3 days even hwy 11.”

Georgina Brennan Sock also sent out a message to activists and their allies: “New camp site in Laketon has about 15 people surrounded by about 20 rcmp vehicles, and rcmp are scattered everywhere please come in numbers.”

In a broader movement to end shake gas exploration, Avaaz is hosting a petition for New Brunwickers to sign to convince the province to allow a referendum into fracking and hopefully a moratorium on fracking.

Major Elsipogtog benefit concert in Halifax, November 30

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From the Facebook notice:

As promised!! Elsipogtog Benefit Concert time and venue details for Halifax, Saturday, November 30th!! **2 parts, 2 venues, 2 mins from each other lol**

First Location:
Mi’kmaq Native Friendship Center
6-8:00pm: Cultural Showcase, Vendors & Silent Auction!

Our Cultural Showcase features an internationally renowned group of Mi’kmaq singers, Eastern Eagle, as our host drum group. We also have All Nations Drum Group, dancers from all powwow styles and a Hoop Dance Exhibition. The Silent Auction will include Artwork, Fancy Shawl and Jingle dresses, hand drums, earrings, and anything else people would like to donate to help the benefit raise funds. All vendors are welcome and can contact me to reserve a table!

Second Location:
The Marquee Ballroom (19&Up)
8pm-2am: Fashion Show, Stand-Up Comedy, Solo Singers and 4 Live Bands!

To start, we have one super funny Mi’kmaq.. who was recently voted as Halifax’s Best Comedian, nominated by the ECMA’s, and host of “The Candy Show”, Candy Palmater, as our nights event host!! The Fashion Show will showcase HeadRush, The Vault and InkStarz Native designs by “Natasha Patles” and “Dwayne Ward”- which will include both female and male Mi’kmaq models. We then have special guest, “Ryan McMahon”, a very hilarious Ojibway Comedian, who’s flying in from Winnipeg to do Stand-Up Comedy for us! Our stacked music line-up includes Listiguj’s very own “Melissa Girven” and “Gmanwolf Productions”, “Kicking Krotch”, and two Aboriginal Hiphop Music groups who were recently nominated by the East Coast Music Awards for Aboriginal Recording Of The Year, “City Natives” and “Black & Grey” to perform for us LIVE!!! 🎤

This is a great cause and one East Coast event you don’t want to miss!! You can contact myself, Shelley Young, Molly Jean Peters, Sarah Swasson, Charmaine Sock, Savvy Simon and Marina Ann Young if you would like to purchase tickets. You can also order them from me via EMT, and have them mailed to you right away. Tickets are selling fast, so get em before they’re gone.